Posts Tagged ‘VDOT’

PEC FOIA Request – New VDOT emails released about bypass

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Witness the confusion and questionable nature of internal VDOT emails about the bypass and its cost. Scroll to the bottom of the page at the following link for the audio file of the story, including UVA theatre students reading the comments.

Emails on VDOT’s 29 Bypass

 

Jacob’s Run bridge on Advance Mills Road to be replaced

Friday, July 15th, 2011

In October 2011, the 1984 wooden bridge over Jacob’s Run, 2 miles south of the Advance Mills Bridge, will close for four months. The new bridge will be a concrete box structure and will be 24 feet wide, a large improvement for safety on the corner. The wooden bridge is splintering and the concrete is cracking. The curve in the roadway will be straightened with this rebuild, according to VDOT.

Northbound Travelers will detour northwest on Buck Mountain Road to Buffalo River and Frays Mountain Road to return  to Advance Mills north of the reconstruction project. The detour is about 9 miles.

Advance Mills Bridge Party

Saturday, June 25th, 2011

Remember that great day – April 16, 2010, when the Advance Bridge Mills opened? With the support of 500 homeowners sending daily emails to get the attention of VDOT, we managed to get our replacement bridge in a time of meager funds. The importance of the bridge for the safety of local residents and the connectivity of the region helped prioritize the project. (see photos below)

In October 2011, the wooden bridge over Jacob’s Run, 2 miles south of the Advance Mills Bridge, will close for four months. The new bridge will be a concrete box structure and will be 24 feet wide, a large improvement for safety on the corner.

On Snow Plowing

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

I want to give thanks for the efforts of the Free Union and Yancey VDOT depot workers who dealt with the December 17 storm. The workers gave us their all, trying to clear interstate highways, secondary roads, and neighborhood streets.

To me the lesson is that we have too few people and machines available to deal with such a storm. Eighteen years ago there were twenty giant orange dump trucks at the Free Union depot, each with a crew to operate it each shift when needed.  After successive cuts at the state level, this force was reduced to four orange trucks and crews while 80 subdivisions were added to the state highway inventory. Was the savings to the state bottom line worth the danger and loss for the citizens? Does privatization work when the private vehicles are too light to deal with this kind of snow? The same result occurred in March 1993, when successive snows immobilized the area. It was two weeks before people could move in Earlysville Forest and a resident died waiting for an ambulance as four farmers on tractors tried to plow a path.

It is fashionable to think government is the problem today, but our community and our individual citizens need reliable and effective public  safety support, to prevent injury and property damage. Any potential savings must be balanced against the cost of lost wages and lost productivity to our workers and businesses, the cost of lost learning time for our students, and the cost of life and limb as hundreds of vehicular accidents occur. Perhaps this recent weather event will help us focus on these needs. Being prepared is not just a motto, it is a way to survive and thrive when hazards appear.

Citizens can share their views with their delegates and senators in Richmond who have power over the budget for VDOT.  See the right sidebar for contact information.